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Show and Tell Meetings

We have been busy this autumn meeting our fabulous supporters and patients and presenting our research work.

We had two separate patient/supporter meetings; one for bronchiectasis, and one for pulmonary fibrosis to celebrate #Breathtember (Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month).

At the Pulmonary Fibrosis/Interstitial Lung Disease event, Dr Porter along with our fabulous clinical fellows and scientists presented their integral and very interesting research work into PF.

Presentations included:

  • Dr Akif Khawaja:  The role of neutrophils in Interstitial Lung Disease: a novel target for treatment.
  • Dr Deborah Chong: The role of platelets in Interstitial Lung Disease.
  • Dr Theresia Mikolasch: The first UK non-invasive lung biopsy service.
  • Dr Theresia Mikolasch: Using Cryobiopsy to assess Inhaled drug delivery to the distal lung.
  • Dr Manuela Plate:  Can we use circulating DNA to tell us about genetic changes in the lung?
  • Dr Wes Wellard:  Finding new genetic mutations in patients with IPF.
  • Dr Jagdeep Sahota:  The role of mucins in IPF.

After lunch, the focus group discussed future areas of research into interstitial lung disease.

The scientists loved meeting you and one scientist said that meeting you helped ‘motivate us to do more and do it better and quicker’.

 

At the Bronchiectasis Evening, Professor Brown explained what we know about bronchiectasis and what we still need to find out. And, importantly, how Breathing Matters can help. This was followed by a lively Q+A session when Professor Brown answered some in-depth questions on the treatment of the disease.

We were also treated to Jane Walker’s personal and touching account of coping with her condition. Jane organises our annual Christmas Concert and we were lucky to have one of the Holst Singers along with a representative from Pharma Profile who has given a donation towards the costs of staging this concert, with us that evening.

It was so lovely to meet so many of you in person and we look forward to seeing many of you at our Christmas Concert at St Paul’s Church in Covent Garden on Friday, 8th December 2017.

These meetings show how Breathing Matters have helped research into both lung diseases since our inception in 2011, and it is thanks to all our fundraisers and donors that this has been achieved.

We could not have done this without your support – thank you!

 

You Got out of Breath for #Breathtember!

Thank you to all of our supporters who Got Out Of Breath for #Breathtember last month to help raise awareness of pulmonary fibrosis during September’s world PF awareness month.

From hiking, cycling, climbing to giving up fizzy drinks.  You all did your best to spread the word about pulmonary fibrosis.

Our #Breathtember twitter champion this year was ….. Steve Wright who walked a fantastic 50 miles during the month.

And why did we do this … here’s why:

  • Men are nearly twice as likely as women to suffer from IPF.
  • There are 5000 new cases of IPF every year in the UK.
  • 50% of IPF sufferers die within 3 years of diagnosis.
  • More than 30,000 people will be diagnosed with IPF in the 27 EU countries each year. 
  • IPF is more common than all leukaemias conbined. 
  • Most patients are diagnosed 1-12 years after their first symptoms. 
  • 5 million people worldwide have IPF. 

We need more funding to change these statistics.

Thank you for your help during #Breathtember … let’s make a difference together!

Get out of Breath for #Breathtember this September

September is #Breathtember – Global Pulmonary Fibrosis Awareness Month

 Get out of Breath for #Breathtember

https://www.breathingmatters.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/twitter.png

Tweet Tweet!

To help raise awareness, we would ask that supporters tweet different challenges each day in September including the term ‘#Breathtember and to ask their followers to retweet and share this information as widely as possible.

Think outside the box for your challenges – getting out of breath for you could mean:

  • Cycling around your local park
  • Doing a colourful or musical 5K/10K run or walk
  • Singing until you are out of breath
  • Walking over the wonderous London bridges
  • Blow bubbles!
  • Skydiving
  • Or just simply walking up the stairs!

The important thing is that you tweet your challenge every day including the term ‘#Breathtember’ to raise awareness of pulmonary fibrosis.  Add a photo if you like.  This September, we want as many people as possible to see the term ‘#Breathtember’.  To make the biggest impact, the aim is to get the term ‘#Breathtember’ to trend.

Follow us on Twitter for further details: @breathingmatter 

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Windsor Royal Parks Charity Recital

Catherine Porter knows Breathing Matters and, for her, it is a family affair.  Her much loved Aunt Eileen was diagnosed with the life-limiting degenerative lung disease pulmonary fibrosis.   It was a devastating diagnosis, but in the aftermath, Catherine knew her Aunt was getting the best medical care available because if she had any queries about the treatment her Aunt was receiving she could ask for advice from her Aunt Jo who is a consultant and research scientist at University College London and who co-founded the charity, Breathing Matters.

Catherine is a University of Cambridge cello scholar, and she is joining up with Philip Howard, international award winning pianist, to hold a recital in Windsor Great Park in aid of Breathing Matters.  This is being held at Cumberland Lodge on the evening of Sunday, 23rd July 2017.

Tickets are free, but you will need to reserve your ticket at 01344 624279 as there is a named door entry.

Directions: www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk

Come along and enjoy great atmospheric music and a glass of wine in this beautiful 17th Century building in the Great Park.

If you are not able to attend, please support Catherine at: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Catherine-Porter1183

Click here for more information

 

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London Marathon 2017: a Runner’s Personal Race Report

Colin Bathe ran this year’s London Marathon in support of Breathing Matters to raise funds and awareness of pulmonary fibrosis. This is his personal account of the day.

London Marathon. An iconic race that everyone has heard of and one that most runners and many non runners say that they would like to do one day. Include me in that.

6:00 am: This is still the middle of the night in my book and not a suitable time for the alarm clock to go off. However, it is race day so time to get up, have a rather unexciting cheese sandwich for breakfast and then after a final kit check get a ride to the Surbiton station from Nik to start my journey to the start.

So why run marathons and the London Marathon in particular? I’ve now done 5 marathons and 10 ultras (races longer than marathon distance) so I should be able to answer that easily. I can’t though. I could say that I love doing them (and I do) but generally end up finishing in a considerable amount of pain which could last for many hours and who can love that? I could mention getting fit but shorter distances would do that just as well if not better. The challenge is definitely part of it. Can I do that distance? Can I do that distance in this time? These are self generated challenges, only of interest to myself, but completing a long run in a decent time definitely gives me a buzz even if I usually end up at the first aid station afterwards.

London is easier to explain. Curiosity. The biggest race I’ve been in had 2,000 runners, so London, with twenty times as many, is going to be a completely different experience. It has fantastic support from spectators with people lining almost the complete route, many bands and other entertainment by the side of the road. It is also pretty flat and all on road, two things I’ve not done before at marathon distance.

It is also difficult to get into which by itself suggests it is something special.

7:00 am: Surbiton railway station. It appears that I am not alone with most people wearing running shoes. Most of the remainder appear to be supporters.

Many of the railway franchises are allowing London Marathon participants to travel for free. This doesn’t include South West Trains though so I have to pay for my ticket. The wonders of modern technology allow me to achieve this by waving my phone over a pad on the gate. Anyway, the train is on time and not particularly full so gets me quickly into London and Waterloo station.

There are various ways of getting into the London Marathon, some easier than others.

For men, if you can run a 2 hour 45 minute marathon then you can get a place as an elite runner. This is just plain laughable for me.

For 41 to 49 year old men, a 3 hour 15 minute time in the last year will get you a Good For Age place. My best time before London was 3 hours 45 minutes in the Cornish Marathon so I was still some way off being able to enter via this route.

Probably the easiest way of getting in is via a charity place. The London Marathon raises a lot of money for charity and this has to be commended. However, many people don’t realise that the charity has to pay a minimum of £300 for this place. This means of the money people raise, the first £300 doesn’t go to the charity, it goes the London Marathon organisers instead. On principle, I refuse to get a place this way. Just to be clear, I am very happy for people to run for charity and did so myself. I also understand why the charities are keen for people to raise money this way.

7:30 am Waterloo East Station. Things are starting to get a little bit busy with runners everywhere. There are three starts for the London Marathon which all join up after a few miles. Red is the charity places, Green is the Good for Age runners and Blue is for the ballot places and club runners. Different stations service the different starts and as I’m in Blue, I’m going to Blackheath with the other ballot / club runners.

The other methods of entry into London are via the general ballot, which is open to everyone, and getting a place via a running club. This year there were roughly 250,000 entries for 10,000 ballot places so a 1 in 25 chance of getting in. Truro Running club was given two places with about 20 people looking for a place so a 1 in 10 chance that way. Overall the chance of getting in isn’t great, but the more times you try the better your chances are.

It took me six years, but last year my number came up and I received a ballot entry for the 2017 race. My sister of course, also managed to get a place. On her first try. Some people get all the luck.

Note: Many people remember the time that you used to get a guaranteed place after five rejections. This was discontinued a while back as it was unsustainable.

8:00 am Blackheath. It is now just the matter of a short 15 minute walk to the start. Things now really are getting busy with people everywhere. On the way, I pass the Reopening Vehicle. This follows the runners at 7hr finish pace and indicates that the roads can be cleaned up and reopened. I very much hope not to see this vehicle again.

I have arrived probably a bit earlier than really needed with an hour and three quarters to waste before the start of the run. I does mean though that I can use one of the many toilets without having to queue.

 

Running is my hobby and I do many runs / races a year and trying to raise money at each isn’t really appropriate. London though is different and special so I had decided a long time ago, that if I got in, I would try to raise money for charity. There are many worthy while charities that deserve help so how to you choose which one to run for? Regrettably, my choice was easy.  I chose to support Breathing Matters.

9:00 am. There is now just an hour to go before the start and I’ve managed to meet up with Hollie, James, Helen and Lynne. Thank you Mr Superman for taking the picture.

 

We all seem to be ready, but all are a little bit nervous. Not only us though, everyone at the start. This means that there are something like 15,000 to 20,000 people who all want to go to the loo at the same time. This causes a queue, but not just one. Each group of portable toilets has its own queue which is has a marshal at is head shepherding people as quickly a possible in the next available receptacle. It all seems to work and Hana will be pleased to note that they were clean and well stocked when I made use. This was early on though and they may not been as great later on.

I also managed to meet up with my sister at the start. She wasn’t late but left it close, with only just enough time to visit the loo and drop off the kit bag before making over to the start pens.

Breathing Matters is a charity that performs research into idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This is a disease that I hadn’t heard of until my mother was diagnosed with it,  although it kills as many people as lymphoma or leukaemia and about half that of those who die of breast cancer or prostate cancer. IPF causes the lungs to scar and basically stop working which means sufferers end up on oxygen as they struggle to draw breath.

As IPF has a low profile, research into it gets very little funding even though it affects so many people. This includes four other members of my direct family as well as my mother who passed away in 2010. It could also potentially affect me and my sister as well as others of the next generation in the family, though a genetic link hasn’t been proven.

Running London for Breathing Matters was an easy decision to make.

10:00 am The Start. My biggest worry about running London was the start as I wasn’t sure how it was going to go. I wanted to do a good time, but I had heard various stories about it taking a long time to get over the line and then the first few miles being so crowded with people that it was difficult to go at your target pace.

My starting pen was further back than I would like so as the start approached and the pen barriers were removed, I moved forward from the 3:45 pacer, past the 3:30 pacer and ended up beside the 3:15 pacer. This was faster than target, but hopefully it would mean I could dictate my own pace and people could go past me if they wanted.

 

I run pretty much everywhere with my phone and carefully record my routes using the GPS. My app of choice is runkeeper and I’ve used it for the last three years. You would have thought that I knew how to use it by now. Unfortunately, about 30 seconds before the start, I discovered that I managed to put it into a mode where it doesn’t record GPS and there was no obvious way of switching it back. Back into the pocket, my phone went with no tracking running. Fortunately, I had a back up with my GPS watch so I would just have to rely on that.

I’m sure that there was some sort of bang at the actual start, but I really can’t remember. I can recall waving at the camera as I crossed the line which I did 50 seconds after the actual start. No long delays for me so that was one worry out of the way.

I always go too fast at the start and I wanted to try and be sensible, but what pace should I go off at? 8 minute miles average would get me my target of 3 hours 30 minutes, but it would need to go a little faster than this to give me a buffer. 7:30 minute miles would give me a 3:15 finish and a Good for Age result, but this really wasn’t on the cards.  7:45 pace maybe?

But what was I capable of? My 3:30 target was fifteen minutes faster than my PB which is a lot to knock off. London though is flat and all on roads so will be fast, but completely different to the tracks and hills I normally run on. Will I find it easy and be able to keep to a fast pace or will I find it really hard and have to slow? Lots of questions, but no easy answers.

Mile 1. The first mile marker comes into view and there is a problem. The clock on the course says 8 minutes, but my watch says I’m running at 7 minute mile pace. One tells me I’m a bit slow, the other is telling me I’m a lot too fast.

Ah yes, I need to knock 50 seconds of the clock time to correct for the time it took me to get over the start line. I’ve gone off too fast again you idiot.

The next few miles are a bit better at around 7:20 to 7:30 pace and I’m keeping up with the 3:15 finish pacer. The route is crowded, but everyone is going at pretty much the same pace so it isn’t difficult to run. I feel good, this is within my capabilities, I’m not pushing it to keep up, it is early, but this feels sustainable. Maybe, just maybe, 3:15 is on the cards? Should I slow down and ensure the 3:30 finish or keep at this pace and see what happens?

At this point I also remember that I have more than one app on my phone for creating GPS traces, so out it comes and I have it going in seconds. Why didn’t I think of doing this at the start? Oh well.

Mile 5. At this point, the red and blue routes have merged. This makes things more crowded, but also combines the race pacers from each group. I’ve been running a little behind the 3:15 blue pacer. However, as the two starting groups combine, I discover that I am ahead of the 3:00 red pacer. Eeek! However good I think I am, I’m not a 3:00 hour marathon runner and don’t want to go at this pace. So what has happened? Is the 3:15 blue pacer fast or is the 3:00 red pacer slow? I start trying to do mathematics on the times…

So, 6 miles is coming up, I think I’m going at 7:30 pace so 6 times 7 = 42, add on 6 times 1/2 which is 3. What was the first number, ah yes, 42. What was the second number, ah yes, 3. Is that a water station coming up? Why is that person in front of me running diagonally. Oh no, there is a bollard in the middle of the road. So 42 plus 3 that is 45. But I need to remember to correct for the my start time so subtract 50 seconds. No, that isn’t right, add 50 seconds. Yeah, I think that’s right. Now what was the question?

Doing anything involving thought whilst running a marathon really isn’t possible.

Mile 6 Greenwich / Cutty Sark. I was being supported in London by Nik and her cousin Den. They were out on the course and I seem to remember them saying that they planned to see me at around the 6 mile mark, a bit before the Cutty Sark. I kept a look out for them, but unfortunately I missed them and they missed me (actually this is not true – they were there just after Mile 5 and they saw me there). It was nice to think that they were out there somewhere though amongst the crowds.

The support all the way around was amazing. There was only a few places were there were gaps between those watching and in most places the crowds where many people deep. The noise was very loud, especially the drums under the bridge and my name was called many many times. It really is an event which gets you to perform to your very limit, there is barely a second where you aren’t being encouraged.

Mile 8 Toilet stop. Ah yes. Hmm. Lets just say that the portable toilets at mile 8 are not for you Hana. Enough said.

Mile 12 Tower Bridge (first time). Coming across the bridge, I happened to notice the gaps in the road where the road lifts up to allow ships through. For some reason, this was more interesting than anything else. No matter, I can look at the main structure as I pass the second time.

It was at this point that the first signs of trouble raised their head. I was doing well and the 3:15 pacer was still just ahead. Fortunately, the 3:00 pacer has disappeared, further on, hopefully making up time so I didn’t have to worry about going at that pace. Unfortunately, my right foot announced that it had a blister and was really rather hot and bothered. Wouldn’t you mind slowing down just a little bit?

Mile 15 Canary Wharf. Nik and Den were out again on the course and this time they caught sight of me. Less fortunately, I completely missed them despite being on the look out, their signs and them yelling their heads off.

A certain distraction at this point was my legs, not only did I have a painful foot, but my calves and hamstrings were really starting to hurt. My pace had dropped and the 3:15 pacer had disappeared into the distance, but I was still moving a good pace so onwards.

Mile 18 Isle of Dogs. Ok that hurt and could only be one thing. My blister had popped.

Mile 21 Canary Wharf. On the look out for Nik and Den again. Unfortunately, I missed them again though again they spotted me and yelled their heads off. A pity as it would have given me a lift which I needed. This was probably my lowest point. There was still a long way to go and I was in a lot of pain with feet, calves, quads and hamstrings all competing to complain the loudest.

I had quite a buffer to finish within my 3:30 target, but I was going slower all of the time and those around me where in general overtaking me. If I slowed too much, I was in danger on going over 3:30 and I really didn’t want to do that. But surely I could get away with a little walk? That wouldn’t matter would it? Just a quick little rest for my tired legs?

I ignored the voices and kept going.

Mile 23 Tower Bridge (second time). Three miles to go. It is just a parkrun. I’m still on target. I can do this. Don’t stop. Keep going. Ignore the pain. It isn’t important.

I completely missed Tower Bridge the second time around, I’m sure it was there, but I no recollection of seeing it.

Mile 24. Where the hell is Mile 24? If Mile 24 doesn’t come up soon, I’ve blown my 3:30 finish. Where is it? No, no, no. I can’t have slowed down that much can I? Lets gently panic, but … Just Keep On Going …

Mile 25. How did I miss Mile 24? Who cares, I don’t give a monkeys. I have one mile to go and I’m easily going to make my target. I feel good.

Finish. I come down the last section and pass the 600m sign, then the 400m sign with just one thought, getting to the end and stopping. The clock says 3 hours 2 something and I’m done.

I find out afterwards that Will, Kate and Harry were giving out medals on the line for a while and one runner came through and received a medal from one of them without realising and completely blanked them. I can completely understand this. I was completely shot and my emotions were all over the place. I would have likely done exactly the same thing.

Finish Area. I often have a funny few minutes after a long race and today was no different. I have discovered that if I keep walking, I can get over the worst of it so after picking up my medal and goody bag, I spend a while walking loops outside of the medical tent. My legs and blisters would prefer that I didn’t do this, but they get no choice as otherwise I lose all the blood out of my extremities and generally look and feel terrible.

Once I feel a little better, I enter the medical tent and ask for help with my blisters. The tent appears fairly busy, but there are enough medics to end up with four of them attending me, two per foot.

 

My blisters aren’t pretty and I will save you the pictures; however, one of them was good enough that one of the medics asked permission to take his own pictures. I can just imagine him bringing out his slide show of horror pictures at his next dinner party.

Afterwards. I was quickly able to meet up with Nik and Den and spent a fair while on the grass feeling not so great thank you. A small portion of expensive chips sorted me out though and I was able to meet up with Helen, Lynne and my sister.

Nik was able to tell me that my finish time was 3 hours 27 minutes 27 seconds. This was eighteen minutes faster than my previous best. A time I am very happy with.

So why do I run marathons? I still can’t answer it. I am writing this report fours days later and I can still only walk short distances due to my blisters. This still doesn’t put me off and I’m now looking forward to doing 40 miles in three weeks’ time, assuming my feet have sort of recovered.

Will I do London again? I’m not sure. Likely I will, but I’m thinking I’ll try and get a Good For Age place by running 3:15 in another marathon and then run London in fancy dress and not worry about the time. I’ll likely enjoy it more that way, though I certainly don’t regret running my feet off (literally!) this time. Not next year though.

I will also do my running shoes up that little bit tighter. I think that was all I did wrong to cause the blisters. Such a simple thing.

A big thank you to my support team of Nik and Den. It was very much appreciated. Thank you too to all those that have sponsored me. Together, over £1000 has been raised for a very worthy cause.

Breathing Matters are so thankful to Colin for supporting us.  If you would like to support Colin and make his day all the more worthwhile, please visit:

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Colin-Bathe-IPF

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Every Breath You Take

Breathing is an instinctive, vital and unconscious process and so it can be hard to believe that you could be doing it better, especially if you have a lung disease and suffer with breathlessness. But it is possible that, even with Interstitial Lung Disease / Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (ILD/IPF), you could be breathing better.

ILD/IPF causes scarring in the lungs and reduces the efficacy of breathing; the lungs become stiffer and less elastic, reducing their ability to expand. This eventually affects the transfer of gases in the airways, as the scarring hardens and thickens the airways, breathing becomes more difficult and breathlessness start to occur during activities of daily living. Cough is the other symptom often mentioned by patients. Yes, all of this is due to the disease process, but something can still be done to help you manage your symptoms better.

Eastern medicine has always focussed on breathing control, promoting it as an adjunct to treat poor health. Qi-gong, Tai-Chi and yoga all focus the mind on utilizing your breathing muscles (especially your diaphragm) to achieve a flow of movement and deep relaxation to restore the body’s balance. Western medicine is starting to take this holistic approach on board and one such complementary therapy is Buteyko. The Buteyko Breathing Technique (BBT) is an approach which considers your physical and mental condition within the context of your lifestyle, environment and diet. The focus is on anxiety, relaxed breathing, diet, stretches, stopping cough and breathlessness all of which have a role to play in ILD/IPF.

The current evidence base is in asthma, showing quite strongly that it helps manage symptoms alongside pharmacological therapy and significantly improves quality of life for patients (British Thoracic Society /Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network 2016, Global Initiative for Asthma 2016). It is not seen as a magic pill and it is not necessarily about being symptom free or drug free, but it’s a way of self-managing and feeling more in control of breathlessness and cough.

The BBT method comes from Konstantin Buteyko, who developed the theories as an intern in Moscow in the 40’s and 50’s. It showed dramatic results and the programme was rolled out amongst asthmatic children across Russia who were admitted to hospital. The technique spread to New Zealand, Australia and eventually came to the UK in the late 1990’s at The Hale Clinic in London. It was initially seen as a pseudoscience, with the reasons that Buteyko put forward for why the technique worked being disproven; however, current evidence has shown quite strongly that it works, and therefore it has been included in UK guidelines as mentioned above.

Figure 1 describes how the more anxious you become about being breathless, the more breathless you will become due to physiological responses occurring. BBT teaches you to control this as you keep your breathing even by switching on your parasympathetic nervous system and therefore turning off your fight or flight response.

 

 

Physiotherapy will assess how you are breathing during rest and during activity and review what things are like for you on a daily basis. Depending on your goal, a management plan will be written with you. The number of sessions required depends on your need, but it is usually around six, with treatment focussing on nose breathing, diaphragmatic control and control over cough. You will be required to do some work at home and it takes some commitment as you are trying to instil a new habit, but you should notice the difference within 1-2 weeks if you stick with it.

BBT has been shown to be effective in other lung diseases with no adverse effects documented. BBT will help you to manage your condition better and you will be supported by a physiotherapist during this period. If this is something that you think you may be interested in, speak to your respiratory consultant at your next follow up appointment.

Written by: Helene Bellas, Specialist Respiratory Physiotherapist, University College London Hospital

 

 

Cyclotopia – because Cycling Matters

Cycling Fun   Raising Funds

Experience an action-packed family fundraising day out at the iconic Olympic Velodrome facilities at our Fun Day for all ages at the Lee Valley VeloPark on Sunday, 11th June 2017.

Cyclotopia Package includes:

  • Road Circuit – Cycle on the premium mile long track.  Who can go the fastest?  Who can go the longest?
  • Mountain Bike Trails – Challenge yourself on the exciting off-road trails.
  • Static Bike Racing 
  • Tour de France – Experience Tour de France training in the studio
  • Young Kids BMX – Right in the centre of the Velodrome, not to be missed
  • Kids free under 12 years

Velodrome Package includes:

  • A training session at the Velodrome, the fastest track in the world, with expert coaches.
  • Exciting timed laps.
  • Special guest!
  • Complete Cyclotopia Package.
  • Age 12+
Meet and cycle with Paralympic Champion, Mark Colbourne MBE !!!

This event has something for everyone – from complete novices to experienced cyclists.

To register, visit: http://bit.ly/2cKDKZq

 

 

[Cartoon kindly adapted by @RosAsquith from her book, ‘Max the Champion’ – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Max-Champion-Sean-Stockdale/dp/1847805191]

Healthy Volunteers Needed for UCL Respiratory IPF Trial

Would you like to contribute to Medical Research in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

UCL Respiratory are currently recruiting volunteers to study the IPF fingerprint in the blood.

 

What does it involve?

Participation involves travelling to UCL Respiratory at the Rayne Institute UCL, 5 University Street, London WC1E 6JF, and donating approximately 30mL of blood.

What are the requirements?

You can participate if you are healthy and over 55 years of age.

Who will take my blood?

The blood sample will be taken by an experienced, trained phlebotomist.

Is 30mL a lot of blood?

30mL of blood is a small amount, a blood donation to the blood bank is generally 500mL.

What about travel expenses?

Travel expenses to and from UCL can be reimbursed (subject to prior approval).

Contact us

To volunteer, request more information on the study and on how to take part in it or to book an appointment (no obligation to take part), please contact:

Dr Manuela Platé – email: m.plate@ucl.ac.uk  tel: 020 3108 7736  mobile: 07411 070805

Mr Wes Woollard – email: w.woollard@ucl.ac.uk  tel: 020 3108 7736

 

Cyclotopia – Last Few Days For Early Bird Tickets

Cycling Fun   Raising Funds

We are offering Early Bird tickets (at 2015 prices!) for our fabulous cycling fundraiser, Cyclotopia, at the Lee Valley VeloPark on Sunday. 11th June 2017.

Experience an action-packed family fundraising day out at the iconic Olympic Velodrome facilities at our Fun Day for all ages!

Cyclotopia Package includes:

  • Road Circuit – Cycle on the premium mile long track.  Who can go the fastest?  Who can go the longest?
  • Mountain Bike Trails – Challenge yourself on the exciting off-road trails.
  • Static Bike Racing 
  • Tour de France – Experience Tour de France training in the studio
  • Young Kids BMX – Right in the centre of the Velodrome, not to be missed
  • Kids free under 12 years

Velodrome Package includes:

  • A training session at the Velodrome, the fastest track in the world, with expert coaches.
  • Exciting timed laps.
  • Special guest!
  • Complete Cyclotopia Package.
  • Age 12+
Meet and cycle with Paralympic Champion, Mark Colbourne MBE !!!

This event has something for everyone – from complete novices to experienced cyclists.

To register, visit: http://bit.ly/2cKDKZq

Hurry though, before they sell out!

[Cartoon kindly adapted by @RosAsquith from her book, ‘Max the Champion’]

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Thank You For Your Fundraising During 2016

We are truly indebted to all our fabulous supporters; we exist because of you!  Here are some of the amazing fundraising events you organised and helped with last year:

Cyclotopia Charity Cycle Event, Lee Valley Velodrome 12.6.16

Christmas Concert, St Paul’s Church, Covent Garden 9.12.16

Breathing Matters Charity Stalls x 6

  • Tough Mudder
  • London Marathon
  • Bundles of bike rides, including the Croydon to Torquay Cycle
  • Coast to Coast Walk
  • Ironman Austria
  • Yorkshire 3 Peaks
  • Skydives
  • Brighton Marathon
  • Bristol Half Marathon
  • Prudential 100
  • Zumbathon
  • Great North Run
  • Cyprus Half Marathon
  • Swim Serpentine
  • London 10K
  • Marlow River Swim
  • Jersey Triathlon
  • Grim Reaper Ultra Marathon
  • Birthday party donations
  • Great Birmingham 10K
  • Panto … oh yes we did!

PLUS MANY MANY MORE!!!!