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May 2021 Newsletter – Top 10 Quiz Answers

Top 10 selling [physical] singles of all time:

  1. White Christmas – Bing Crosby, 1942
  2. Candle in the Wind – Elton John, 1997
  3. In the Summertime – Mungo Jerry, 1970
  4. I Will Always Love You – Whitney Houston, 1992
  5. Rock Around the Clock – Bill Haley & His Comets, 1954
  6. It’s Now or Never – Elvis Presley, 1960
  7. We Are the World – USA for Africa, 1985
  8. If I Didn’t Care – The Ink Spots, 1939
  9. Yes Sir, I Can Boogie – Baccara, 1977
  10. My Heart Will Go On – Celine Dion, 1997

Top 10 selling [digital] singles of all time:

  1. Shape of You – Ed Sheeran, 2017
  2. Despacito – Luis Fonsi featuring Daddy Yankee, 2017
  3. Spotlight – Xiao Zhan, 2020
  4. Work – Rihanna featuring Drake, 2016
  5. Something Just like This – The Chainsmokers and Coldplay, 2017
  6. Perfect – Ed Sheeran, 2017
  7. See You Again – Wiz Khalifa featuring Charlie Puth, 2015
  8. Closer – The Chainsmokers featuring Halsey, 2016
  9. Rolling in the Deep – Adele, 2011
  10. Uptown Funk – Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars, 2014

Highest grossing films of all time

  1. Avatar – 2009
  2. Avengers: Endgame – 2019
  3. Titanic – 1997
  4. Star Wars: The Force Awakens – 2015
  5. Avengers: Infinity War –  2018
  6. Jurassic World – 2015
  7. The Lion King – 2019
  8. The Avengers – 2012
  9. Furious 7 – 2015
  10. Frozen II – 2019

Top 10 bestselling fiction books of all time:

  1. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, JK Rowling – 1997
  2. The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry – 1943
  3. Dream of the Red Chamber, Cao Xueqin – 18th century
  4. The Hobbit, JRR Tolkien – 1937
  5. And Then There Were None, Agatha Christie – 1939
  6. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, CS Lewis – 1950
  7. She: A History of Adventure, H Rider Haggard – 1887
  8. The Adventures of Pinocchio (Le avventure di Pinocchio), Carlo Collodi, Italy – 1881
  9. The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown – 2003
  10. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, JK Rowling – 1998

Top 10 bestselling author of all time:

  1. William Shakespeare
  2. Agatha Christie
  3. Barbara Cartland
  4. Danielle Steel
  5. Harold Robbins
  6. Georges Simenon
  7. Enid Blyton
  8. Sidney Sheldon
  9. JK Rowling
  10. Gilbert Patten

[Answers taken from Wikipedia]

 

 

Virtual London Marathon – Places Available!

The VIRTUAL Virgin Money London Marathon returns this October 2021, giving you the chance to take part in this year’s Guinness World Record-breaking attempt!

General entry is now sold out.  The only way to be a part of the world’s biggest-ever marathon is to secure a charity place, and Breathing Matters is lucky to have a few coveted places.

Whilst 50,000 runners are running the traditional London Marathon from Blackheath to The Mall, a further 50,000 runners in the virtual event will be running the same distance, just in a place of their choosing!  Last year’s Virtual Virgin Money London Marathon, which was held for the first time in 2020, was awarded an official Guinness World Records title for the Most users to run a remote marathon in 24 hours’ at 37,966 runners.  The organisers want to smash this record in the 2021 race – and if they do, every runner will have the opportunity to claim their official world record certificate.

Run 26.2 miles on your own course over 24 hours – Your Run Your Way!

  • Date:            Sunday 3rd October 2021, 00:00:00 to 23:59:59
  • Where:         Anywhere
  • Register by: 16th July 2021
  • Entry:            £20 plus £200 sponsorship

Email breathingmatters@ucl.ac.uk to sign up now.

Don’t miss your chance to become a world record holder!

 

Help Us Ensure Captain Tom’s Legacy Lives On

On 6 April 2020, Captain Tom Moore set out round his garden to thank our NHS heroes. One hundred laps later, he’d raised an incredible £38.9 million for the NHS Covid-19 appeal.

His simple message of hope – “Tomorrow will be a good day” – inspired millions around the world and brought comfort and joy to so many during the pandemic.

Like many other charities, Breathing Matters has been hugely impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic, with the cancellation of many fundraising events and subsequent loss of income over the last year.

Now it’s your turn to build on that legacy. Friday 30 April would have been his 101st birthday and to honour him and his amazing achievements, The Captain Tom Foundation would love everyone, of all ages and abilities, to take part in the Captain Tom 100.

Do it your way! – Everyone of all ages and abilities is invited to take on a challenge around the number 100 anytime and anywhere over Captain Tom’s birthday weekend – it’s the May Bank Holiday weekend, so you’ll have lots of time.

Here’s How It Works – It’s so simple.  

1. Dream up your 100 challenge. It can be anything you like – here’s some examples:

  • Walk 100 laps of your garden, just like Captain Tom.
  • Run for 100 miles over the weekend, or 100 minutes … or 100 seconds!
  • Bake 100 cakes.
  • Dance/cycle for 100 minutes (1 hour, 40 minutes).
  • Write 100 letters.
  • Swim 100 lengths of the pool.
  • Do 100 keepy-uppies.
  • Walk 100 steps on your hands or do a handstand for 100 seconds.
  • Tell 100 jokes.
  • Do 100 burpies, press-ups or sit-ups.
  • Climb your stairs 100 times.

But the best challenges are the ones you think up yourselves!

2. Take on your Captain Tom 100 challenge any time between Friday 30 April and Monday 3 May 2021.

3. We would humbly ask that you raise funds for Breathing Matters.

Encourage your family and friends to take up the challenge and together we’ll all ensure Captain Tom’s legacy lives on.

Help inspire the next generation of Captain Toms by sharing your pictures and videos on social media, using the official hashtag #CaptainTom100

Captain Tom merchandise – https://www.captaintom.net/captain-tom-shop/

Thank you for keeping Captain Sir Tom’s legacy alive and for helping Breathing Matters.

 

 

 

Our Three Forefathers

There are 3 important gentlemen that were instrumental in creating our charity.  Without them, simply put, there would be no Breathing Matters.

1. Mr Balwant Tamhane

Balwant’s daughter is Manjiry Tamhane – Patron and co-founder of Breathing Matters.

Balwant died from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in 2008.  Manjiry says of her father, “He was the life and soul of any party. He was laid back, carefree, open-minded and adventurous. He came from a humble background, but worked and studied hard to provide a better life for his children and went on to become a Partner in a top London architectural firm.”

In the first 72 years of his life, Balwant was rarely ill. He hardly ever went to see a doctor and had never been admitted to hospital. He was fit, active and generally in good shape.

In the summer of 2008, Balwant started to have flu like symptoms, which was unusual for him.  These persisted and his breathing became laboured and wheezy. He was admitted to hospital and placed on oxygen. He was diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; 5 weeks later he had died.

When the doctors diagnosed IPF, Manjiry went straight to the internet to search for information. Back in 2008, there was very little information available apart from a few obscure research papers from Japan and the US describing various theories and inconclusive results. Manjiry did find a US website called the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, but information in the UK was sorely lacking. She knew at the time something needed to be done about this and went straight to meet with Professor Geoffrey Laurent to see if she could help change this.

2. Professor Geoff Laurent

Professor Laurent was a founding member of Breathing Matters while he was Medical Director of the Centre for Respiratory Research.

Geoff Laurent was an acclaimed scientist and a globally renowned world class researcher on every aspect of respiratory health.  A lover of life, he was blessed with an ability to bring people together in the spirit of collaboration and innovation. His curiosity and intellect were infectious.

Having completed his Bachelor of Science degree with first class honours at the University of Western Australia where he was born, Geoff was driven to seek out the best scientific outcomes from across the world. He studied at the National Heart and Lung Institute/Royal Brompton Hospital London and eventually became Professor and Director of the Centre for Respiratory Research at UCL. Geoff published over 200 articles in international journals of biomedical research and was awarded the European Respiratory Society Presidential Award for his contribution to lung science. In 2006, he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and President of the British Association for Lung Research.  At UCL, Geoff established himself as one of the world leaders in chronic lung disease research, focusing primarily on lung fibrosis.

When Manjiry Tamhane came to see him in 2009 to talk about how she could help the world of pulmonary fibrosis, Geoff used his collaborative skills and was inspirational in getting together a team to create the first UK based charity that focussed on lung fibrosis and infection research – which was to become Breathing Matters.

We are sad to report that Professor Laurent passed away in 2018, but he is fondly remembered at Breathing Matters and his spirit thrives within us all.

3. Lawrence Matz

Lawrence Matz was an inaugural supporter of Breathing Matters.

Lawrence had a unique gift of being able to make everyone feel as though they were the special one. The life and soul of any party, he would always stand out in the crowd. Nothing was too much for him and for his wife Gloria, his two boys Mark and Adam, family and friends – he would do just about anything for them. He lived every day like it was his last, cramming more into his all too brief time than most of us can expect to achieve in a lifetime. He enriched so many lives with his vibrancy, charm and love.

In 2009, Lawrence was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis.  He built up a strong bond of mutual respect with his consultant Jo Porter and wanted to help with her passion of creating a charity for research into pulmonary fibrosis.  During 2010, he regularly met with the Breathing Matters strategy and build team to give his help and advice, and he and his wife Gloria attended our launch in February 2011.

Unfortunately, having been relatively stable for nearly 2 years, Lawrence started to decline very quickly and it was clear that his own lungs would not keep going for much long despite treatment. In July 2011, Lawrence was needing oxygen for 24 hours a day. He was accepted on to the urgent transplant list, but very sadly, a transplant did not become available in time – 6 weeks later he died.  Jo and the team promised to fight on towards a cure for this cruel disease.

As engraved on his memorial stone, Lawrence taught us all the true meaning of courage.  Over the next few years, Lawrence’s loving family and friends raised £45K for Breathing Matters in his memory, and this initiated our fundraising effort towards that promised cure.

 

Top 10 Highlights in 10 Years

1: Involving You

We have had many opportunities to meet our supporters over the years from small personal meetings to large tours; both are very special to us – you are the lifeblood, or the lungs (!), of Breathing Matters.

Our launch event on 19th January 2011 seems like only yesterday.  Professor Geoffrey Laurent, the then Director of the Centre for Respiratory Centre, was joined by his team of scientists and researchers as well as respiratory doctors.  It was attended by over 100 patients and relatives.  Speakers included Jo Porter, Malcolm Weallans and Manjiry Tamhane who spoke about topics ranging from living with respiratory disease through to the importance of patient support in shaping future scientific research and ways you could directly help us.  Our scientists were inspired by meeting our supporters and the patients whom their work helps.

Since then, you have attended our research meetings, events and our patient supporter meetings; you have helped us steer the way forward and shaped our research; you have advised on our fundraising and awareness strategies, you have attended our centre tours to see our labs and talk to our researchers about our work, and you have helped celebrate our achievements.

2: The First UK Treatments for IPF

In 2014, UCLH became an NHS-England Specialist Centre for the diagnosis and management of Interstitial Lung Disease.  This was important and timely as it enabled our doctors to prescribe idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients with Pirfenidone and Nintedanib – the first treatments in the UK available to IPF patients. These antifibrotic therapies slow decline in lung function and reduce the risk of acute respiratory deteriorations.

This was a game-changer.

3: Funding Clinical Fellows and Their Research

Breathing Matters has funded three celebrated Clinical Fellows:

  1. Lawrence Matz Clinical Fellow – Dr Theresia Mikolasch, who set up our Cryoscope Service and was the original soldier in our Neutrophil Army.
  2. Mark Hulme Clinical Fellow – Dr Helen Garthwaite, who worked on our important PET response studies.
  3. Christopher Whittington Clinical Fellow – Dr Emma Denneny, who is currently working on novel biomarkers to detect lung fibrosis with a blood test, earlier than standard CT imaging.

The work that our Clinical Fellows have done has enabled us to leverage a further £450,000 in grants.

4: Pioneering Diagnostics – Cryoscope

Our Lawrence Matz Clinical Fellow set up the Cryoscopic Lung Biopsy Service at UCLH, a pioneering minimally invasive diagnostic technique.  The cryoscope was part-funded by Breathing Matters.  In February 2013, UCLH diagnosed idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis from a cryoscopic lung biopsy – this was a UK first.

This was important for:

  • The Patient: who undergoes a day case procedure as opposed to a surgical lung biopsy, thereby avoiding hospital admission, an unsightly and painful scar and a chest drain.
  • The histopathologist: who said the quality of the tissue and preservation were excellent and much better than other minimally invasive biopsies due to the freezing during the procedure.
  • Our ILD research programme: We now have access to lung tissue that is removed, but is excess to that needed for clinical diagnosis.

5: Predicting and Detecting Pulmonary Fibrosis

A lot of our research is looking at better ways to detect pulmonary fibrosis even whilst the lung CT scan is normal. Our ultimate aim is to make an early diagnosis of PF with a blood test. Until then, we are looking at using very very sensitive imaging techniques, such as PET scans and MRI, to detect early changes in radiologically normal lung on CT scans. We have found that we can predict how severe PF is and how quickly it will progress from these PET scans and they may even help us guide treatment. Another exciting area is radiogenomics in which we use imaging patterns to understand the role of genes that predispose individuals to developing IPF.

6: Breakthroughs in Lung Infection

Through work partly done at UCL/H, bronchiectasis was proven to be more prevalent in the UK than previously thought – leading to better GP awareness, diagnosis and treatment.

We highlighted that bronchiectasis in those with weakened immune systems due to haematological disease develops very quickly; better awareness will make doctors much better at recognizing these patients and referring them to specialist centres, such as UCLH.

Our other work uses computers and CT scans to measure the exact degree of the dilatation of the bronchi in patients with bronchiectasis.  This is a significant breakthrough as it will allow us to follow what happens to a particular patient over time, and rapidly identify if things are getting worse.

The Bronch UK national study was the first study funded by the Medical Research Council into bronchiectasis for many years. The aim of the study was to look into the spectrum of disease caused by bronchiectasis, how severe the disease is and how it actually affects the patients’ quality of life.  Thank you to our 150 recruits!

Breathing Matters has supported the important PHOSP-COVID Urgent Public Health study looking into the long term effects of the COVID-19 virus which causes lung infection.

7: Spreading the Word

Where would the medical world be without scientists and researchers?  How would they get new treatments for their patients?  How would GPs find out about new or little known diseases and know when and how to act quickly?

Breathing Matters has reached out and spread awareness through various ways over the last 10 years.  Each September, we highlight global pulmonary fibrosis awareness month through our #Breathtember campaigns, we communicate regularly with you via our website, newsletters and social media, we have held awareness stalls in our hospital [world pneumonia day, #Breathtember, organ transplant month, bronchiectasis charity stalls] and at local institutions, including Sainsbury’s where we were Local Charity of the Year.  We even advised on the IPF storyline on Coronation Street in 2019.

8: FUNdraising and FUNdraisers

Breathing Matters has had some amazing and innovative fundraising challenges over the last 10 years.  We started our fundraising journey in 2011 with the first of our charity bike rides in Richmond Park.  After 4 years, we went bigger and moved to the Olympic Velodrome offering a myriad of biking challenges.  One of our star fundraisers, Jane Walker, with the help of many of our supporters, including the Holst Singers, has now raised £30K for bronchiectasis research through the Breathing Matters charity stalls and charity concerts-amazing!  Keeping ahead of the curve, our charity silent discos at the London Steam Museum were a big hit and 2020’s virtual fundraisers were challenging in a different but safe way. But our supporters have come up with some of the BEST ideas, including golf days, head shaves and hairdressing days, jewellery sales, bake sales, house clearance sales, swims/walks/runs/bike rides of all distances, motorbike challenges, spinathons, zumbathons, charity CD, concerts and recitals, going up mountains, falling from planes or bungying, books, boxing, dieting, giving up alcohol or smoking, charity beer, charity dinners, pancake events, husky sled trails and even a tractor run … among many many more!

9: Royal Visit

In 2016, UCL Respiratory was honoured when HRH Princess Anne paid us a visit.  The Princess Royal attended in her official capacity as Chancellor of UCL to officially open the refurbished labs.  During her visit, HRH met with the designers and architects along with our important researchers and scientists, and was treated to a tour of the labs.

The Breathing Matters team was introduced to the Princess Royal and it was a huge honour to have the opportunity to talk with her about the charity and what we’ve accomplished.  HRH asked us to “keep up the good work” and, with your help, we have done just that!

10: Your Support

You, our supporters, have helped us achieve so much.

With YOUR help, at 3 years, we had reached £250K; at 7 years, we had reached £500K; and at 9 years, we reached an incredible £750K – all because of you!

We have decided to keep our charity small so we have little overheads, enabling all your hard-earned fundraising and donations to be funnelled into our vital research.

 

If you would like to help us ‘keep up the good work’ and make a difference, you can do so via our Justgiving Page or email us on breathingmatters@ucl.ac.uk for our bank details.

 

 

Valentine’s 10K – care and share

Join our fun Virtual Valentine’s 10K with your loved one, be it a friend, brother/sister, mum/dad, partner or all your family bubble – a great excuse to get out (legally). Do it in your own way and in your own time.

All you need to do is register – here’s how:

  1. Register here – you will receive a confirmation email to log in to the Secure Charity Portal where you can pay your registration fee [£25 covers the cost of the place and medal only and does not go to the charity].
  2. Breathing Matters will get notification that you have signed up for your challenge and will contact you – or you can contact us directly at breathingmatters@ucl.ac.uk
  3. Set up a Breathing Matters personal fundraising page.  It is up to you how much you want to raise for Breathing Matters; there is no minimum sponsorship limit.
  4. Choose your partner and start training!!!

For more details, click here: https://bit.ly/3rDpJjd

Virtual Valentine's Day Run

Pay half now half later on amazing challenges

We know from talking to our amazing supporters that, no matter how motivated you are, it’s as tough a time as ever to commit to paying a challenge registration fee in one lump sum. To help those supporters that have a charity challenge in mind but who are struggling to get their registration fee together, the new scheme from our partners Global Adventure Challenges is here to help! 

The brand new Challenge Booster Scheme allows adventurers to secure their space on selected treks, cycles and sleds with a payment of just 50% of the registration fee. The remaining 50% will be due by the end of April 2021 – giving you a guaranteed dose of excitement, and something incredible to look forward to – and we all need that at the moment!

This offer ends at midnight on Sunday, 31 January 2021, so now’s the time to take the plunge and secure your space.

There are some truly dream challenges available for 2021 and 2022, including the stunning Northern Lights Trek, the beautiful Cycle Thailand/China/Mallorca, the historically scenic Inca Trail Trek and the woofable Husky Trail Dog Sled.

For a full list of the challenges included in this offer, please click here – please note, most UK & European cycling and trekking challenges are excluded.

 

 

 

 

 

An Ode to 2020

To mark the end of this difficult year, one of our lovely supporters has written this poem:

 

Wishing all our family and friends a very Happy New Year!!

Goodbye 2020: farewell, adieu,

We’re so glad to see the back of you!

You’ve brought so much hardship, sorrow and pain,

We hope never to see your like again.

You ruined our Holidays and plans this year,

And caused our nation to live mostly in fear.

Tight restrictions and lockdowns made us all see

How important it is just to be free.

We will look back at you in years to come

As a time when we all had to stay at home.

At midnight tonight, when you depart,

Your legacy will be many a broken heart.

And so we rejoice this New Year’s Eve

As dastardly 2020 finally takes its leave!

Here’s to a Happy New Year everyone!!!

 

Our Christmas and New Year Message

We hope that you and your families are all well and have survived 2020.  Thank you all so much for supporting us during this tough time.

It has been a strange year and a very busy one.  In March, many of our research staff took up the call to work on the frontline and the rest of the team worked hard on COVID-19 clinical studies to find life-saving treatments.

COVID-19 is a Respiratory disease, one that especially affects the Respiratory tract, and we are beginning to learn more about the lungs through this research.

It is clear that the SARS-CoV-2 virus (that causes COVID) is unusual.  It can affect the blood vessels resulting in a constellation of symptoms. One of the startling findings is that we are seeing new pulmonary fibrosis develop in about 6 of every 100 COVID patients that are admitted to hospital, and in around 3 in 100 of those treated in the community with mild COVID. It also appears to worsen fibrosis in patients who already have lung fibrosis, so access to the vaccine for our patients with pulmonary fibrosis is vital.  We are particularly interested in why some people get fibrosis after COVID and others don’t and we hope this will provide crucial insights into the whole spectrum of pulmonary fibrosis. We are closely following nearly 1000 patients who were admitted to UCLH with COVID or who been referred to us with breathing problems after COVID infection. Understanding how many get better, and how many have progressive fibrosis is critical for patients and the NHS to plan ahead.

Unfortunately, even after getting rid of the virus, many patients will continue to have symptoms that can be very debilitating. Breathing Matters has supported the national Urgent Public Health study, PHOSP-COVID. This study will discover what the long-term effects on health might be after being hospitalised with COVID-19 infection.

We have of course also been deeply committed to helping in delivering trials of new vaccines at UCLH. It is wonderful that we have not only one, but maybe as many as three different effective vaccines. We are hopeful that widespread vaccination will bring us all a return to normality in 2021.

Of course through all this, the main thing that has kept Breathing Matters and the team going is your vital, continuous and unwavering support.  Many health charities have seen dramatic reductions in income over 2020 with little respite in 2021. We hope that by keeping our overheads as low as possible and bringing in funding from other sources, and with your help, we can weather this storm.

Fundraising has taken a back seat this year with fundraising events, including the London Marathon and the Prudential Ride London cancelled.  However, we do have plenty of virtual events to whet your fundraising appetite, including a Virtual Christmas Concert given by the excellent Holst Singers. If you want to plan a future challenge overseas in 2021/2022, we have plenty of amazing events including the Northern Lights Trek in Iceland, Yosemite to San Fran cycle and a trek around the Great Wall of China. For inspiration, take a look at our Events Page.

In January, Breathing Matters will be 10 years old.  We have come a long way in a decade.  Particular highlights have included the following:

  • Our development of relative non-invasive cryoscopic lung biopsy as an alternative to chest surgery to biopsy the lung, to make a confident diagnosis of fibrosis and rule out other conditions that would require different treatments.
  • Our findings that FDG-PET scans can detect the changes of early lung fibrosis before a regular CT scan and may provide a very sensitive way to measure response to therapy in patients with pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Our 10 year collaboration with Vicore which will see a new drug (C21) being tested in patients with IPF with a study set to start recruiting in early 2021.
  • Our understanding of the role of the white blood cells, neutrophils, in the development of pulmonary fibrosis which may lead to novel blood biomarkers to assess patients most at risk and help us develop novel approaches to therapy.
  • Participation in the multicentre Bronch UK research project which includes around ten hospitals across the UK. This is the first such study and will help us learn a lot more about bronchiectasis and how best to treat it.
  • Completion of two phase I trials of novel vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the commonest cause of pneumonia, partly or wholly developed by Professor Brown’s laboratory.
  • Published important data on how common bronchiectasis is in the UK, showing that, far from being a disease that is dying out, it is increasingly common and is associated with an increase in mortality including perhaps surprisingly from diseases of the heart and large blood vessels. These data are quoted by all the major guidelines for bronchiectasis and have helped promote awareness of the disease as well as shown the high need for further research.

In 2021, we will focus back on our pulmonary fibrosis and lung infection work with renewed vigour and with the firm belief that, as a community, we can overcome anything if we all do our bit.

If you would like to donate to support our research, you can do this via our JustGiving Page. Thank you to our regular donors that make such a difference to our research and enables us to plan our future projects.  If you are interesting in giving regularly, please read our article.

Thank you all for your vital support.  Together we have hope and together we are stronger.

We would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and here’s to a healthier New Year!

From Everyone at Breathing Matters

 

 

 

Christmas with the Holst Singers

Very sadly, we are unable to be all together this December for our annual Christmas Concert at St Pancras Church, but to bring us all together at this special time of year, our friends in the Holst Singers have very kindly donated a recording of a small selection of carols for us.

The recording begins with a presentation by Professor Brown and Jane Walker which gives an insight into life at UCLH this year during the pandemic with reference to its impact on patients with bronchiectasis and also on our fundraising activities.

Please click here to listen to our Christmas recording.

If you would like to make a donation towards research into bronchiectasis and pneumonia led by Professor Brown and his team at UCL Respiratory, please click here
(Please use Google search engine to download the recording link).

With our warm wishes for Christmas and New Year 2021.

From Breathing Matters

Our grateful thanks to the Holst Singers and to the Lord Taverners for supporting this recording.