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Let Off Steam at our Silent Disco

If you haven’t been to a silent disco before, you don’t know what you’re missing.  This concept is straight out of the festivals and sweeping across the UK and is becoming more and more popular. This is your chance to experience a silent disco in an awesome setting. And for a fantastic cause too!

DJs do battle over separate wireless channels, playing the best in disco, 80’s and guilty pleasure classics. Don a headset and choose your favourite tune. No distraction – just dance!

The silent disco is on Friday, 9th November 2018 at 7.30pm till late at the London Museum of Water and Steam.

This museum, based right beside Kew Bridge, is an iconic and historic building, housing fabulous working engines from times gone by.

This is a unique opportunity to explore the museum after hours.

Why not make it extra special and be a VIP for the evening – VIP guests will enjoy:
– Complimentary prosecco [half bottle].
– Canapes.
– Exclusive raised gallery with a fantastic view of the steam hall.
– Private seating area.
– Unfortunately, no wheelchair access for VIP guests.

Need to know:
– Print out tickets or show on mobile. No ticket: no entry.
– Cash only bar.
– Bring change for the cloakroom (£2.50).
– Bring cash for a chance to win big money in our Money Share game.
– Nearest station: Kew Bridge (few mins’ walk), South Western Railway.
– Directions: www.waterandsteam.org.uk/plan-your-visit
– Free car parking for 20 cars; first come first served. There is one dedicated parking space for orange or blue badge holders.
– Wheelchair access for standard tickets only.
– Free WiFi

Don’t delay, buy your tickets here

[Donations gratefully received from Bates Group and Sainsbury’s Warren Street towards the cost of this event.]

 

 

Summer 2018 Newsletter

 

For our Summer 2018 Newsletter, please click here

 

 

Jewellery Stalls

Our Breathing Matters’ stall this Friday 4th May 2018 is going to be our first Jewellery stall. The handmade bead jewellery has been very kindly donated to us by the family of one of Professor Brown’s patients. The lady had bronchiectasis and very sadly she has recently passed away. During her illness, she took up bead making as a hobby and the family thought the most fitting tribute would be donate her jewellery in the hope it could be sold to raise funds for Professor Brown’s research into bronchiectasis and lung infection. There will be a selection of necklaces, earrings and bracelets for the first stall…..there are over 150 items in total. 

The stall will be in the UCH atrium from 11.00 until 1pm this Friday 4th May 2018. 

Do come along to support this stall if you are in the London area.  We are hoping that Friday will be the first of many jewellery stalls.

 

 

 

Spring 2018 Newsletter – Answers to the 2017 UK Firsts Quiz

 

Q: Who was announced as the 13th Doctor Who?

A: Jodie Whittaker

 

Q: What is the biggest selling single of 2017?

A: ‘Shape of You’, By Ed Sheeran

 

Q: Who won the BAFTA for Best Film in 2017?

A: La La Land

 

Q: What was the best selling book of 2017? [Data from the Guardian]

A: Non-fiction = ‘5 Ingredients, Quick and Easy Food’, by Jamie Oliver ‘- sold 716K

A: Fiction = ‘Bad Dad’, by David Walliams – sold 568K

 

Q: Who won Strictly Come Dancing?

A: Joe McFadden

 

Q: What were the top 3 boys and girls names of 2017? [Data from the Office of National Statistics]

Boys                            Girls

Noah                           Olivia

Harry                          Amelia

Oliver                          Emily

Our Most Important Lung Fibrosis Paper to Date

We are delighted to announce the publication of our collaboration with the Insititute of Nuclear Medicine and our most important lung fibrosis paper to date. This work investigates the use of molecular imaging to more accurately determine disease severity in patients with pulmonary fibrosis.

Win T, Screaton NJ, Porter JC, Ganeshan B, Maher TM, Fraioli F, Endozo R, Shortman RI, Hurrell L, Holman BF, Thielemans K, Rashidnasab A, Hutton BF, Lukey PT, Flynn A, Ell PJ, Groves AM. Pulmonary 18F-FDG uptake helps refine current risk stratification in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2018 Jan 16. [Epub ahead of print].

For the last 5 years, Breathing Matters has collaborated on a programme investigating the ability of PET scanning to more accurately predict prognosis in individual patients with IPF and other forms of lung fibrosis.

[Combined high resolution CT image (Left) and PET image (Right) in a patient with IPF. The CT images (A) show honey comb lung (arrow) and PET images show high signal in the honey comb area (black, at site of broken arrow). Groves et al J. Nucl Med. 2009;50:538-45.]

The newly published paper in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine, consisted of a unique 10-year prospective study of 113 IPF patients (the largest PET study in IPF) and the first of its kind to evaluate the use of FDG (glucose metabolism) PET scanning to predict prognosis and disease progression against the current standard, Gender Age Physiology (GAP) scoring system.

The findings demonstrate that FDG (glucose metabolism) PET scanning can help identify patients with IPF who are at increased risk of death and might therefore benefit from early treatment.

The figure below shows, for the first time,  that patients with IPF who have a higher lung glucose metabolism are significantly ( p<0.003) more likely to deteriorate rapidly, despite having features that would conventionally place them in a good prognostic group. This data suggests that current treatment guidelines may need to be reviewed, as currently patients placed in a conventionally favourable group are not recommended for treatment.  This novel imaging biomarker may allow us to evaluate new treatments more quickly by looking for changes in PET signal in individual patients.  This will mean that smaller cohorts of patients will be needed for clinical efficacy trials, with a reduction in time to bring new medicines to patients.

Dr Porter reports, “This is a potential game changer in the stratification  of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, giving additional information that complements the current GAP score and allows us to more accurately predict outcomes for individual patients.  This means that we can reassure patients with a low glucose uptake on the scan; but intensify follow-up, treatment and early transplant referral in those patients with high glucose uptake. This is better for patients and allows us to provide a more effective and efficient ILD service”.

 

Is Sputum the Answer to IPF or are we just MUC-king around?

Lung disease will contribute to the death of 1 in 5 people. Many people suffer from chronic lung disease that impacts on their ability to function on a daily basis. Many chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and bronchiectasis are characterised by the presence of excessive numbers of white blood cells or leukocytes that are recruited to the lung from the blood stream.

In particular, the white blood cells, called neutrophils, are recruited at the earliest signs of lung damage.  In small numbers, these neutrophils are essential to fight infection, but in larger numbers, or in more activated forms, they may cause damage to the lung, especially if they deploy their anti-microbial activity before they cross into the airspace.

Before reaching the airspace in which inhaled pathogens are encountered, the neutrophils must pass across the airway epithelium and then they come into contact with the layer of airway mucus that protects the airway from infection.  We propose that the epithelial-mucus barrier acts as a checkpoint to prime neutrophil function in health, so that neutrophils are only fully activated once they have passed across the epithelium, thereby limiting collateral damage.

However, patients with IPF have higher numbers of neutrophils in their broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and this also correlates with severity of disease. Furthermore, a genetic mutation that increases the amount of Muc5B, one of the airway mucins, has been identified as a risk factor for developing IPF (either sporadic or familial). Muc5B has been implicated in inducing neutrophils to expel fibres of DNA called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and in our preliminary data, is a strong chemoattractant for neutrophils.

Dr Jagdeep Sahota has applied to the Medical Research Council to carry out a project will allow us to identify factors that alter the behaviour of neutrophils as they migrate through the lungs to eradicate infection and the role of MUC5B and TGF beta (a profibrotic cytokine implicated in the development of IPF).  Dr Sahota has been able to develop preliminary data using funding from Breathing Matters.  Her ultimate aim is to develop novel targeted therapies to reduce neutrophil mediated lung damage whilst maintaining effectiveness against infection. These therapies may be applicable to other chronic lung diseases.

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Challenge Yourself

Sometimes, a cycle at a national park, a coffee morning at your local cafe or a 10K run is just not enough of a challenge. Sometimes, you need to go further afield!

Breathing Matters has teamed up with Global Adventure Challenges who offer some amazing charity challenges. There are so many international challenges to choose from at www.globaladventurechallenges.com, but here’s just a few fabulous examples:

 

Nepal, Everest Base Camp Trek:  15.11-2.12.18, 7-24.3.19, 14.11-1.12.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£449 + £3,750 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£449+ £1,875 + airport TAX

 

Tanzania, Kilimanjaro, Machame Trail Trek:  20-30.6.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£475 + £4,150 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£475 + £2,075 + airport TAX

 

China, Great Wall Trek:  11-19.5.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£299 + £2,700 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£299 + £1,350 + airport TAX

 

USA, Rock the Canyons: 11-18.5.19, 14-21.9.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£449 + £3,750 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£449 + £1,875 + airport TAX

 

Morocco, Sahara Desert Trek: 14-19.3.19, 31.10-5.11.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£175 + £1,800 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£175 + £900 + airport TAX

 

USA Yosemite to San Fran Cycle:  21-29.9.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£475 + £4,600 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£475 + £2,300 + airport TAX

 

India Cycle: 15-24.11.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£349 + £3,000 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£349 + £1,500 + airport TAX

 

Madagascar Cycle:  27.9-6.10.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£399 + £3,800 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£399 + £1,900 + airport TAX

 

Lapland: Husky Trail Dog Sled:  30.3-6.4.19, 7-14.4.19

Minimum sponsorship:

£449 + £4,000 + airport TAX

Self-funding:

£449 + £2,000 + airport TAX

 

Payment Plan

There are two ways of funding your challenge; minimum sponsorship or self-funding.

For payment option A – minimum sponsorship – You pay the non-refundable deposit (the first sum above) to Global Adventure Challenges.  This is used to organise your trip including securing airline seats and relevant permits. You then commit to raising the minimum sponsorship (the second sum above) for Breathing Matters.  You can set up a Justgiving Page from our home page (https://www.justgiving.com/breathingmatters) and 80% of the minimum sponsorship MUST be raised no later than ELEVEN WEEKS BEFORE DEPARTURE as this is when Breathing Matters will pay your challenge costs direct to Global Adventure Challenges.  Failure to raise this money may mean non-participation and cancellation of your challenge so it is important to raise your funds early.  The remaining 20% should be received no more than two weeks after your challenge finishes (we may ask for proof of offline pledges). We would be grateful if you could try and raise as much as you can over the minimum sponsorship target as every penny of this is what Breathing Matters will receive.  The more you raise, the more research work we can do and the more your challenge will have been worthwhile.

For payment option B – self-funding – You pay the non-refundable deposit (the first sum above) to Global Adventure Challenges which is used to organise your trip including securing airline seats and relevant permits. Ten weeks before departure, Global Adventure Challenges will invoice you for the balance (the second sum above) and this should be paid within two weeks; eight weeks prior to your challenge.  Although there is no minimum sponsorship target for this option, we would encourage you to raise as much as possible for Breathing Matters (via https://www.justgiving.com/breathingmatters). The more you raise, the more research work we can do and the more your challenge will have been worthwhile.

If all the above fills you with dread, why don’t you check out many more challenges including those closer to home in the UK, including Hadrian’s Wall Trek, Ben Nevis Trek, Lakes 4 Peaks, Edinburgh Night Ride and Coast to Coast cycle on www.globaladventurechallenges.com

Always Remember: Breathing Matters!

 

 

A Festive Feast of Singing

We had a fabulous evening last night at St Paul’s Actor’s Church, Covent Garden, for our annual Christmas Concert. We were entertained once again by the magical Holst Singers. The concert was sold out and the audience interaction almost brought the house down with popular renditions of ‘Hark! the Herald Angels Sing’ and ‘Once in Royal David’s City’.

Thank you to BBC Radio presenters, Nigel Rees and Charlotte Green who amused us with hilarious Christmas readings.

Thanks also to the fabulous volunteers who worked tirelessly to make the event go smoothly and to Pharma Profile who sponsored the concert.

But a very special thank you goes to Jane Walker who organised the concert and, if you look closely, you can see her singing along with the choir on one of the photos below!

What a wonderful evening to start off the Festive Season.

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Autumn 2017 Newsletter is OUT NOW

 

For our Autumn 2017 Newsletter, please click here

 

 

Answers to The Christmas Card Quiz, Autumn Newsletter 2017

 

Q: When is the last 1st Class UK postal day before Christmas?

A: Thursday, 21st December 2017

 

Q: What year was the first commercial Christmas card sent?

A: 1843

 

Q: In the UK, how many Christmas cards are posted each year?

A: 1.8 billion

 

Q: How many people are on an average Christmas Card list per household?

A: 50

 

Q: Where can you buy our Charity Christmas Cards? 🙂

A: CharityChristmasCards.Com